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The Yeezus Tour #kanye

The Yeezus Tour #kanye

10.09.14 >>
putthison:

Dress Etiquette for the NBA
New York Times reporter Sarah Lyall yesterday live-tweeted a session of the NBA’s Rookie Transition Program, a class for new players that proves that no matter how much money you’re guaranteed, corporate America can still hold you in a room against your will and force you to wear an embroidered golf shirt for three days. Some choice pointers from an NBA fashion consultant, a GQ “executive stylist,” and others:

Every NBA gentleman should have a peacoat, a baseball jacket, a raincoat and an overcoat in his closet, apparently.
It is good to wear an expensive watch, the NBA fashion consultant says. No sunglasses indoors. No headphones. No shlumpy untailored suits.
"This is extremely important. Every one of you must have a navy suit, must have a black suit, must have a gray suit."
When NBA gentlemen leave the house, they should throw on an expensive watch and maybe a signature fragrance, the GQ editor says.
There are many ways of dressing up a cargo pant.
If you can’t articulate how you want your clothes to look, cut a picture out of a magazine.
You can wear the navy blazer with the black pants.

Dear Adam Silver: the Put This On team stands ready to assist should you need a more coherent set of standards than this. And Jesse is pretty tall.
[Pictured: Russell Westbrook, not a rookie at all, I know.]
-Pete

putthison:

Dress Etiquette for the NBA

New York Times reporter Sarah Lyall yesterday live-tweeted a session of the NBA’s Rookie Transition Program, a class for new players that proves that no matter how much money you’re guaranteed, corporate America can still hold you in a room against your will and force you to wear an embroidered golf shirt for three days. Some choice pointers from an NBA fashion consultant, a GQ “executive stylist,” and others:

Every NBA gentleman should have a peacoat, a baseball jacket, a raincoat and an overcoat in his closet, apparently.

It is good to wear an expensive watch, the NBA fashion consultant says. No sunglasses indoors. No headphones. No shlumpy untailored suits.

"This is extremely important. Every one of you must have a navy suit, must have a black suit, must have a gray suit."

When NBA gentlemen leave the house, they should throw on an expensive watch and maybe a signature fragrance, the GQ editor says.

There are many ways of dressing up a cargo pant.

If you can’t articulate how you want your clothes to look, cut a picture out of a magazine.

You can wear the navy blazer with the black pants.

Dear Adam Silver: the Put This On team stands ready to assist should you need a more coherent set of standards than this. And Jesse is pretty tall.

[Pictured: Russell Westbrook, not a rookie at all, I know.]

-Pete

♥ putthison 07.08.14 >>
putthison:

How Clothes Can Affect the Way People Treat You
NPR has an interesting story about how some African-Americans used turbans to deal with discrimination in the Jim Crow era. An excerpt:

Routté’s experiment began after he traveled to Mobile, Ala., in 1943 for a family engagement. He wasn’t happy with how he was treated.
"I was Jim Crowed here, Jim Crowed there, Jim Crowed all over the place," he later told reporters. "And I didn’t like being Jim Crowed."
So he went back in 1947, with a plan.
Before he boarded the train to Alabama, he put on his spangled turban and velvet robes. When the train reached North Carolina during lunchtime, Routté walked over to the diner car where the only vacant seat was occupied by two white couples.
One of the men said, “Well, what have we got here?” to which Routté replied in his best Swedish accent (he had been the only black student at a Swedish Lutheran college in Illinois), “We have here an apostle of goodwill and love” — leaving them gaping.
And that confusion seemed to work for Routté on the rest of his trip. He dropped in on police officials, the chamber of commerce, merchants — and was treated like royalty.
At a fancy restaurant he asked the staff what would happen if a “Negro gentleman comes in here and sits down to eat.” The reply: “No negro would dare to come in here to eat.”
"I just stroked my chin and ordered my dessert," he said.
[…]
"He didn’t change his color. He just changed his costume, and they treated him like a human," says Luther Routté, who has been a Lutheran pastor for 25 years. It "shows you the kind of myopia that accompanies the whole premise of apartheid or segregation."
Through the “turban trick,” Routté basically transformed himself from a threat to a guest — black to invisible.

You can read the whole story here.

putthison:

How Clothes Can Affect the Way People Treat You

NPR has an interesting story about how some African-Americans used turbans to deal with discrimination in the Jim Crow era. An excerpt:

Routté’s experiment began after he traveled to Mobile, Ala., in 1943 for a family engagement. He wasn’t happy with how he was treated.

"I was Jim Crowed here, Jim Crowed there, Jim Crowed all over the place," he later told reporters. "And I didn’t like being Jim Crowed."

So he went back in 1947, with a plan.

Before he boarded the train to Alabama, he put on his spangled turban and velvet robes. When the train reached North Carolina during lunchtime, Routté walked over to the diner car where the only vacant seat was occupied by two white couples.

One of the men said, “Well, what have we got here?” to which Routté replied in his best Swedish accent (he had been the only black student at a Swedish Lutheran college in Illinois), “We have here an apostle of goodwill and love” — leaving them gaping.

And that confusion seemed to work for Routté on the rest of his trip. He dropped in on police officials, the chamber of commerce, merchants — and was treated like royalty.

At a fancy restaurant he asked the staff what would happen if a “Negro gentleman comes in here and sits down to eat.” The reply: “No negro would dare to come in here to eat.”

"I just stroked my chin and ordered my dessert," he said.

[…]

"He didn’t change his color. He just changed his costume, and they treated him like a human," says Luther Routté, who has been a Lutheran pastor for 25 years. It "shows you the kind of myopia that accompanies the whole premise of apartheid or segregation."

Through the “turban trick,” Routté basically transformed himself from a threat to a guest — black to invisible.

You can read the whole story here.

♥ putthison 20.07.14 >>
♥ oatmeal 07.07.14 >>

putthison:

How Pants Should Fit

We’ve written about how tailored trousers should fit before, but our friend Ed over at Panta Clothing just posted some images of a pair trousers he made for a customer, and nothing beats a great example. 

When trying on pants, most people first look to see if the waist fits comfortably, but the waist is actually one of the easiest things to alter. If they’re a little loose, you can take them in, and if there’s enough material inside, you can let them out. The only exception is maybe cotton, where letting out the waist can leave visible holes where the stitching used to be (this doesn’t happen on wool because of the fuzzy nap). 

Instead of focusing on the waist, look for three things:

  • First, make sure the thighs fit comfortably. The legs can be tapered pretty easily from the knee down, but the thighs should fit fairly perfectly off-the-rack. (You can alter the thighs, but it comes with a bit more risk). 
  • Second, look at the seat. On the Panta trousers above, the seat is perfectly clean, with no rumples or folds. This is the hardest part to get right, not just because everyone is shaped differently, but also because we all stand differently as well. For example, if you stand with your hips forward, you’ll need a pair of trousers with a slightly shorter “rise” at the back (“rise” being the measurement from the crotch seam to the waistband). Note, to see whether the seat fits you, you’ll have to look at yourself in a three way mirror, as twisting your torso around will affect how the pants fit. And don’t get too hung up with whether there are a few folds here and there. It’s better to aim for a cleaner fit than not, but you are moving around in these things, obviously. 
  • Third, see if the pants catch on the back of your calves. This is more of an issue with really slim trousers, particularly if you wear over-the-calf socks. If they do catch, you’ll see a bunch of rippling around your calves. 

Overall, the idea for how pants should fit is very much like the idea for how shirts, sport coats, or suits should fit: there shouldn’t be any puckering or pulling anywhere, and you should have clean lines all around. The ones by Panta above are particularly nice, and unless you’ve having something custom made, it might be hard to achieve something as good. Still, the example above is a great way to show what you should aim for. 

(Photos via pantaclothing)

♥ putthison 12.05.14 >>
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